February 27, 1861

April 2, 2007

Went to Auburn to see Mr. Chedell.  I talked to him about the endowment and he promised to give, but has not decided how much.

February 26, 1861

April 2, 2007

Faculty meeting to consider the cases of Amsden and Haywood, who have both been intoxicated.  The former on Tuesday last, and the latter on the 22nd.  We suspended them both till the beginning of next term.  Amsden denies being drunk, but there is no doubt of it.  Haywood feels very badly.

February 22, 1861

April 2, 2007

Holiday in College.  Call on Mr. Fellows about the matter of the endowment.  Mr. Douglas happened in there too, and we agreed to go out this afternoon, all three, in Mr. Douglas’ carriage and see what we can get in Geneva.  We called on Mr. Stone, who will consider the matter; on Mr. Sheldon, who was in New York, and on Mr. Simons, who will consider, and consult with Mrs. Simons. 

February 20, 1861

April 2, 2007

Go to Pierrepont Manor.  I explained to Mr. Pierrepont how the College was situated in consequences of Mr. Ayrault’s death and he, after considering the matter, said he would give me $2,000 in railroad bonds.

February 19, 1861

April 2, 2007

At Albany to attend a meeting of presidents of colleges summoned by a committee of the Regents to confer with them on Bishop DeLancey’s plan for improving college education.  Only three colleges were represented – Union, St. John’s and Hobart. The notices had not been properly sent, though the neglect of the post-office.  We talked over the matter and agreed to adjourn subject to call.

February 18, 1861

April 2, 2007

Busy writing for Gospel Messenger about Mr. Ayrault – his bequests, and also his own obituary. 

February 17, 1861

April 2, 2007

Talk with Mr. Douglas about Mrs. P’s $5,000 gift.  We agreed we would not reckon it at present.

February 16, 1861

April 2, 2007

Copy subscription book so as not to run any risk of loosing my first book, which has Mr. Ayrault’s, with his letter of conditions, and now foots up $43,000.  In the evening go over and have a long talk with the Bishop about his plan for the Colleges.  I am sorry he will not be able on account of the gout, to go to Albany and state his own views to the Regents and the presidents of the colleges on Tuesday.  He has written them in a letter to Pruyn. 

February 14, 1861

April 2, 2007

Much taken up with a committee from the Juniors, whom Dr. Towler had reported for a bolt Tuesday morning and given them to understand that they would be fined, or rather had been. They came to represent the injustice of the thing, and Gibson, who was the spokesman, said they had resolved not to attend recitation in that study (Optics) till the wrong was righted. It appears that Dr. Towler had said to some of them that Shrove Tuesday was in Europe a holiday, and he did not know but it was so here, and supposed there would be no recitation. On that hint they acted, and did not come; and so he reported them for a bolt. Dr. Towler was present at the interview the seniors had with me and much excited and pretty directly gave the lie to Gibson, who was very moderate, though evidently excited. I afterwards told him they must withdraw their threat before the Faculty would even consider the thing, which they did. Then Dr. Towler came and said he could see that there was a collision and there would be great trouble, and so withdrew his report, and the matter ended. He says that, strange and incredible as it may seem, he was honest in thinking it might be a holiday. The whole thing was very curious.

Write for the Gazette notice of Mr. Ayrault’s bequests.

Get a letter from Mr. Swift saying he was sorry Mr. Ayrault had tied up matters so by his will, but we must make a bold push and get the money subscribed.

February 12, 1861

April 2, 2007

Faculty meeting to consider the project now on foot of uniting the Hermean and Philopeuthian Societies in one, to get a better library and better debates. The Faculty were unanimously opposed to it on two grounds, first: the Societies hold their library in trust, and have no right to alienate or transfer them: Second: it is inexpedient to unite the Societies because two are necessary in College and if they were united a new one would soon be formed.

February 9, 1861

April 2, 2007

Prof. Wheeler wanted to know if I thought the Trustees would be willing to allow him to go abroad by and by to study Greek at Athens, and allow him to supply his place in College and take the difference of salary.  I told him I thought they would, and I would favor it.

February 8, 1861

April 2, 2007

Called on Mr. Douglas and saw the plans for the new Chapel. Payne, who was with me, thought it beautiful and unique. We called on Bishop DeLancey. He says yesterday (the day of Mr. Ayrault’s funeral) was the most tempestuous day he has seen in New York in twenty years – thermometer thirteen degrees below zero.

Write to Mr. Swift about Mr. Ayrault’s will.

February 6, 1861

April 2, 2007

Attended the funeral. After we returned to the house the will was read. He leaves Hobart College twenty thousand dollars on condition that we fill up the subscription we are now raising to the amount of sixty-three thousand dollars by one year from his death. He also leaves the College a residuary legatee of two-fifths of one-third of his residual property. Thus he has been very liberal towards the College- a good friend to it.

Present at the meeting of our Christian Brotherhood in the evening.

February 5, 1861

April 2, 2007

I decide to go to Geneseo, as no one else can, and I feel that I ought.  I feel better too, but it is not very prudent.

February 4, 1861

April 2, 2007

I received a telegraphic dispatch informing me that Mr. Ayrault of Geneseo died this morning and that the funeral will be on Wednesday.  I sat down at once and wrote a letter of condolence and expressed my regret that I could not, on account of the state of my health, go to the funeral.  I had always fully proposed, if I should survive Mr. Ayrault, to attend his funeral – my relations to him, both as a friend and as head of the College, have been such as to make it that I should do so, and I am greatly disappointed that I cannot.   I sent Mr. Douglas the dispatch, and he called this evening to express his regret that he could not go because his children were not well. 

February 1, 1861

April 2, 2007

Spent the whole of the evening talking with Rankine about his plans for the Training School here. He seems to have excellent ideas about it, particularly his parochial labors, which he desires to be chiefly among the poor in that part of the town where the Chapel is.

January 31, 1861

April 2, 2007

Talk with Anderson about his father’s opposition to his joining the Alpha Delta Phi Society, and wrote a long letter to his father, as I did the other day, endeavoring to obviate his objection.

January 22, 1861

April 2, 2007

I heard my recitation rather hastily in order to prepare for the meeting of the Board of Trustees at the Medical College at ten o’clock.

John DeLancey called to say his father had returned from Buffalo with so severe a cold he could not come out, and if we could not make a quorum without him we must come to his room. We waited a good while for a quorum, talking over matters informally. Finally when the cars from the west came Mr. Ayrault of Canandaigua joined us; but though we had Mr. Fellows from out of town, we still wanted one for a quorum: so we adjourned to Bishop DeLancey’s bedroom and there transacted business. We did not do much except the regular routine of business for the Medical Department. We passed a formal vote to accept Mrs. Prendergast’s Declaration about her professorship, pure and simple, and inform her of our proceedings. A petition was received from the senior class desiring that the competition for the White Rhetorical be restricted to the senior class – it being now open to juniors also. The Board were of the unanimous opinion that they have no power to alter the statutes deliberately agreed to by Mr. White and requested me so to inform the class. I presided at the Medical Commencement in the evening and conferred the degrees- nine regular and one honorary.

January 21, 1861

April 2, 2007

Busy to-day getting up report and making ready for the meeting of the Board to-morrow- for the Commencement of the Medical College. Copy in large hand the Prayer for the Medical College into my Commencement Book.

January 2, 1861

April 2, 2007

I went this morning to the Medical College with Prof. Pynchon of Trinity College to show him our Cabinet, which he pronounced very fine- far superior to theirs at Trinity.

January 1, 1861

April 2, 2007

Mr. Douglas came in the evening and showed us the drawings for the College Chapel. The perspective, which I had not seen, is beautiful. I was delighted with it.

Christmas Day 1860

April 2, 2007

We had in the Messrs. Spalding- resident graduates, and of the students, Whallon, Gibson and Ashley to dinner.  Things went off very pleasantly.  No wine.  I avoided wine for the students’ sakes and the example to them.

December 22, 1860

April 2, 2007

Write to Prof. Eliot and congratulate him on his election to the presidency of Trinity College and advise him to take orders.  I think it altogether unchurchly to put a layman at the head of a Church college.

December 21, 1860

April 2, 2007

Faculty meeting to talk over Bishop DeLancey’s plan. We all agreed that the restriction of age and the statement of ten from each class, instead of a certain proportion (say one-seventh of each class) were objections. It seemed to us as if there were practical difficulties in the way of securing am impartial examination – in philosophy particularly. We appointed a committee to devise a plan of examinations – consisting of the President and Dr. Wilson.

December 19, 1860

April 2, 2007

Bishop DeLancey called in the afternoon and talked long with me about his plan of public examinations of students in Albany.  I stated objections to the details – as to age and numbers – while approving the general principles.

December 18, 1860

April 2, 2007

At four, College prayers and Matriculation. I delivered an extemporaneous address on “College life a probation”; and Bishop DeLancey, who was in the Chancel, followed with appropriate remarks on what he considered the defects of colleges in his day. The chief were a want of punctuality and a want of thoroughness. He instanced persons whom he had known who could repeat long passages from Homer and Horace from memory and wanted to know if those present could do so. In the evening the sophomore exhibition took place in Linden Hall. Speaking very fine. First prize awarded to Conger and second to Ashley. Prof. Wheeler was greatly outraged at the decision- said Eddy should have had the first prize.

December 17, 1860

April 2, 2007

At my room from two to four excusing absences. In the evening call at Bishop DeLancey’s to invite him to our Matriculation to-morrow. Find Rev. Dr. H. McCurdy there, who has come to confer with the Bishop as to taking the rectorship of the training school.

December 13, 1860

April 2, 2007

Found to-day that Dr. Metcalf was greatly put out by Wheeler’s taking the Greek prize into his own hand. But there was no intention to give offense either on my part or his.

December 12, 1860

April 2, 2007

At half past twelve, Litany ended, the election of orator, poet and reader for February 22nd took place in Dr. Towler’s room. The combination was, of Alpha Delta Phi and Theta Delta Chi versus Sigma Phi and the Chi Phi’s – the neutrals being divided. The Sigma Phi’s &c. found they would be defeated and stayed out. I presided. The Faculty were present except Dr. Wilson. Everything was conducted with good order. The election was by nomination and viva voce – there being no opposition – though they had printed ballots in their hands.

December 11, 1860

April 2, 2007

Potter called and then Hough and Langworthy- Alarmed at the idea of persons being admitted for the nonce to vote at the election to-morrow for orator, &c.  for February 22nd.  I told them they might feel easy, as none would probably be admitted.

Mr. DeZeng spent the evening with me talking about plans for the College.

            At Morning Prayer in the Chapel I spoke earnestly to the students in remonstrance against yesterday evening’s desecration of the Chapel, and warned punishment for any repetition of such a scene.