September 12th, 1862

October 30, 2007

I have the seniors every morning except Monday in Butler’s Analogy. Monday morning I have the Juniors in Paley. At 11:30, I have the seniors in rhetoric and elocution, and Thursday I take the sophomores in the same. They were assigned to Prof. Wheeler, but he did not like to take them, having three recitations, and this being the term for the sophomore exhibition, when it requires more attention and involves more difficulty.

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September 11th, 1862

October 30, 2007

College opens. Wheeler absent- not back from Harper’s Ferry where he acted as adjutant with the 126th Regiment during the vacation. The freshman class come in well and College promises to be as full as it was last year. This is very encouraging when all other Colleges that I know of, are suffering severely.
I find that boys’ schools on the contrary are flourishing. Many persons, by being in the army, are in the receipt of good incomes, and being from home, do not wish to leave their sons without oversight, and so send them to school. Others, finding no business to put their sons at, send them to school. Thus the boys’ schools are full, while the colleges are depleted to furnish officers and soldiers.

August 27th, 1862

October 23, 2007

Meeting of the Board. Complete Mr. Swift’s matter; considered Chaplaincy Statutes, &c. Our committee on nominations were not prepared to name a professor of rhetoric. We had made up our minds to nominated Rev. Walter Mitchell of Stamford, Connecticut, but on proposing the matter to him, he wrote back that he could not think of leaving his parish.

August 19th, 1862

October 23, 2007

Attend the Convention of the Diocese in Buffalo. Met Judge Smith there. Asked him whether the decision of a Supreme Court fully protected the executors of Mr. Ayrault against the residuary legatees, and he said it did fully, and a decision from the Court of Appeals could not be more effectual.

August 18th, 1862

October 23, 2007

Meet the executor of Mr. Ayrault informally at Mr. Cone’s bank in Geneseo. They are resolved to appeal our suit with them.

July 31st, 1862

October 5, 2007

Attend the Commencement of Yale College.

July 19th, 1862

October 5, 2007

Busy signing diplomas, &c. There has been an unusually large number of clergy present at this Commencement.

July 17th, 1862

October 5, 2007

Commencement Day. At the close of morning Chapel made an address to the students commending the results of the year and the examinations, speaking of the new rules for standing, and saying they had worked well – that it was now well understood that no one could continue a member of College who did not work; that this was doe to their parents, the College and themselves. I then dismissed them with the usual good wishes. Meeting of the Board, where the degrees – in course and honorary, were passed.
Prof. Wheeler having failed to correct and return his report in the matter of attendance at Chapel, a resolution was passed that the President inquire why he did not do so.
W.H. DeLancey, Jr., acted as marshal for the procession at half past nine. Linden Hall crowded. Had engaged two constables to maintain order. Before the speaking began, requested the audiences to refrain from talking. Speaking unusually fine. I never knew it so quiet. Made a little speech to the prize men on the stage. Everyone agreed that the Commencement was one of a very high order. I really think that it best I was ever present at anywhere.
Dined at the Franklin House at three-fifteen. Ninety-two in number. Prof. Andrew D. White spoke on “Sister Colleges,” Dr. Bogart on the “Press.” Dr. Coxe was called out as the orator of the Brotherhood; Neely in response to “Our Chaplin.” The speaking was sparking and rapid; just as after dinner speaking ought to be. Praises of it were on every tongue.
At seven p.m. we met at the College Chapel and went in a short procession to lay the corner-stone of the new Chapel, for which I had made all the arrangements. The Bishop led and I walked at his side in my President’s robe and cap. He officiated. Neely led the singing. For the responsive parts slips, which I had caused to be printed, were distributed among the crowd. I read the list of articles in the box, and Rev. W.T. Gibson, D.D. standing on the corner-stone delivered from manuscript a most scholarly and beautiful address on the alliance between learning and religion. The Bishop followed with some stirring remarks on Christ, the true Foundation.
There were many strangers at the levee.
Thus has closed the fifth Commencement of Hobart College under my Presidency. May God accept and bless all my labors to His own glory, the good of His Church and the prosperity of our country.

July 16th, 1862

October 5, 2007

Meeting of Board at 8:10.
Presided at the White Rhetorical. Eight speakers competed – the prize adjudged to Conger. Committee, Prof. A.D. White, Rev. Dr. Payne and Rev. W. Ayrault.
Neely was today elected Chaplain. Went to Linden Hall at eight, where Dr. A.C. Coxe made an address before the Christian Brotherhood of Hobart College. Dr. Coxe spoke very brilliantly and effectively on the office of the Church as educator, and what the Puritans themselves owed to the English Universities. Two or three Romanists and Dr. Wiley, Dutch Reformed, got up and went out in the midst of the discourse, offended, no doubt, at things said. But the audience in general were charmed with it. It was considered a chief feature of the Commencement Week. I was quite proud of my friend – he did so well. He said afterwards that on chief source of solicitude to him was a fear of disgracing me as his friend, through whom he had been invited to speak.

July 15th, 1862

October 5, 2007

Met committee on honors at Bishop DeLancey’s. Preside at the reading of the White Prize Essays at the Medical College at four. Sutphen took the first and Lawson the second prize. At seven, meet committee on nomination of professors at Bishop DeLancey’s. Preside at eight in the Medical College at the reading of the Cobb Prize Essay – awarded to B.W. Woodward. No second prize was awarded. There were two competitors, but the second piece was not regarded as coming up to the standard which ought to be maintained. This Cobb Prize was founded in the name of my wife and her brother, to commemorate their mother, and this was the first award. At nine I returned to the Bishop’s to continue our committee meeting on nominating professors. Agree to nominate Dr. Towler, Prendergast Professor of Natural Philosophy; but did not find ourselves in a position to recommend anyone for the Chair of Rhetoric.

July 13th, 1862

October 5, 2007

I preached the Baccalaureate sermon at four o’clock in Trinity Church.

July 4th, 1862

October 5, 2007

Clergy of the village, including Bishop DeLancey, met at the Franklin House. The procession was formed, and I rode with General Swift, President of the day, Mr. W.E. Sill, Vice-president, and Mr. Rogers, Chief of the Village Authorities. There were several carriages and a company on horse-back, but no footmen. After going through the main streets we entered Linden Hall, where the usual exercises took place and Judge Folger delivered an address on the duties of Government and citizens. Bishop DeLancey gave the benediction.

July 3rd, 1862

October 5, 2007

Slept with my cloths on for fear of disorder. They were very noisy over in Geneva Hall. I went over and found a great part of the College collected in the northwest back room with a cask of ale, which the seniors had furnished as a treat, not having furnished any on class day, as the previous class what done, for which they had been reproached. They were a good deal exhilarated; but they promised solemnly that there should be no noise or disturbance, or destruction of property. I felt sure they were in earnest and true. About half past eleven they went downtown in a sort of procession, about twenty or so, with tin horns, a dinner-bell, &c. giving a sort of mock procession and serenade. I was afraid they would drink downtown and come back so excited as to begin tearing up the board sidewalk in front of the College for a bonfire, as had been threatened; but they retired quietly on coming up to the College and there was no further disturbance.

June 21st,1862

October 4, 2007

Send notices of coming Commencement to Gospel Messenger, Church Journal, and calendar.

June 4th, 1862

October 4, 2007

Class day. The three lower classes bolted their first recitation. Exercises in Linden Hall at four o’clock. I presided, and opened with prayer. C. B. Schuyler, orator of the day, did himself much credit. H. R. Gibson recited the Poem on college life, describing adventures of freshmen, &c. Tuttle’s speech in delivering to the junior class, through W. H. H. Anderson, a supposed Indian paddle with a mysterious history, was a great success, full of humor, drollery and capital acting. Few persons could have done the thing as well as Tuttle. Anderson made a fairly good speech in receiving it. Gibson’s poem and Tuttle’s speech convulsed the audience, particularly the students, with laughter. The whole performance showed great cleverness. The class had a supper at Suydam’s at eight. I heard a band of music strike up at half past one and looked out. I had not gone to bed but was waiting for something to come off, though I did not know exactly what, and saw a torch-light procession dressed in fantastic dresses- somewhat like our “Conics” in Hartford, with four in white gowns carrying a bier covered with a pall, all in the procession being masked- the whole following the Geneva brass band which played a slow, solemn dirge. After marching around town for about an hour and a half they went down by Mr. Douglas’ to the lake shore, where was a pile of brush, &c. They stood round it with their torches while Lawson, in the name of the class, made a speech on burying a student in order to the resurrection of the man. It sounded very well in the still air of the night. They then lighted the pyre, which made a great blaze. As it burned they sang a Latin song to Pleyells’ hymn. All was conducted with order and quiet on the lake shore. I stood on the bank above, leaning against a tree and looking down on the scene through the forks of the oak. The band was here dispensed with, and the class about half past three went to their grove and there had some ceremonies about their tree, and knelt down and prayed a parting prayer there. I could not sleep afterward because there was so much battering over at College. I found that the other classes had barred the seniors out of Trinity Hall, and they took planks and tried to batter down the doors. Prof. Wheeler intervened and opened it. The seniors complained that they had been insulted by Sigs in the upper hall or floor of Trinity Hall. I went out and found them much excited. Pretty much the whole College was up all night. There was little disorder and hardly any drunkenness; but the very fact of the whole College being up all night was of itself disorderly and ought to be guarded against another time.

June 3rd, 1862

October 4, 2007

Faculty meeting at three to see about class-day—agreed to give up the 11:30 recitation and hold to the early one.

June 1st, 1862

October 4, 2007

Dr. Wilson preached in the Chapel on “Thy kingdom come”. He knew I was preaching a course of sermons on the Lord’s Prayer; but that did not matter.

May 28th, 1862

October 3, 2007

Spend most of the morning with the Committee on Salaries and Income- giving information.
Attended in the evening the meeting of the Christian Brotherhood, and read a paper before it.

May 23rd, 1862

October 3, 2007

James C. Smith, who has just been appointed Judge of the Supreme Court in place of Judge Knox, deceased, and who will accept the place, will make a capital judge. He is a man of distinguished attainments and of beautiful character. Though not a baptized man he has family prayers, is very regular at Church twice a day and is very devout in his demeanor. He was brought up a Quaker.

May 8th, 1862

October 3, 2007

Faculty meeting. considering those who failed examinations on the conditions assigned. Ingersoll to fall back a class, Langdon to be suspended four weeks.

May 7th, 1862

October 3, 2007

In New York. Went to the meeting of the Trustees of the General Theological Seminary. No business of importance. The chief topic of debate was a motion of Dr. Vinton’s to have a committee of five to investigate the investment of the Kohne legacy. It was strongly resisted and finally defeated. I voted for it. I wished the Seminary to be relieved from odium if unjust, if just, to be made more vigilant in the future. I stayed over to attend this meeting at Bishop DeLancey’s particular request, as he could not be present; otherwise, I ought to have gone home to-day to be present at the opening of our term to-morrow.